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Posts tagged with "Korea"

Got touched by a 10-year-old…
I work part time at a Paris Baguette, and I got extremely moved by a 10-year-old kid today…
There’s this kid that often comes to our shop…  He came holding his mom’s hand today and was looking closely at the types of cakes we have… Then he points at a Pororo cake and says: “Mom, this one!”, but the mother goes: “You can’t eat chocolate because of your allergies… pick another one”…
But then the kid says: “It’s okay, even if I can’t eat it, my friends can! My friends like Pororo too, let’s buy this one…”

Turning all red and unreasonably moved to tears, and because the kid was so pretty, I bought him strawberry doughnut as a present… That’s what real friends should be… And it seems like so far I haven’t been a real friend to anyone… 

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This was going around on Twitter this morning and somehow I couldn’t help but translate it. It seems to be an old post from NATE (or any other similar Korean Internet community), but… it’s really sweet.

Got touched by a 10-year-old…

I work part time at a Paris Baguette, and I got extremely moved by a 10-year-old kid today…

There’s this kid that often comes to our shop…  He came holding his mom’s hand today and was looking closely at the types of cakes we have… Then he points at a Pororo cake and says: “Mom, this one!”, but the mother goes: “You can’t eat chocolate because of your allergies… pick another one”…

But then the kid says: “It’s okay, even if I can’t eat it, my friends can! My friends like Pororo too, let’s buy this one…”

Turning all red and unreasonably moved to tears, and because the kid was so pretty, I bought him strawberry doughnut as a present… That’s what real friends should be… And it seems like so far I haven’t been a real friend to anyone… 

———————————————————————

This was going around on Twitter this morning and somehow I couldn’t help but translate it. It seems to be an old post from NATE (or any other similar Korean Internet community), but… it’s really sweet.

Just want to ask (if you know) - actually what happen to Chansung? He got robbed by bank and lose money?

Chansung got affected by the latest Personal data leak which was unveiled on Friday. You can read more about it on a number of news portals, including here:

20 million people fall victim to South Korea data leak

Chansung didn’t get robbed by the bank. Someone simply leaked his personal data (name, address, social security number, mobile/home phone number, etc.) to third parties mostly for marketing purposes. Luckily, his banking information (like logins and passwords) weren’t leaked, but it is still a major fail on behalf of the banks, considering that South Korea has been prone to identity thefts and personal data leaks for a number of years now.

That’s one of the reason why South Korea internet banking system is so complicated. They implement tons of different security plugins and password levels that, for example, if you have a security certificate saved in your hard drive your computer is the ONLY place from where you can access your bank account.

However, as it is easy to see, such security measures do not always work if the personal data leak occurs from the inside. Since the banking information has not been stolen and most of the information has been sold for marketing companies, this personal data leak could lead to consequences that are more annoying than dangerous. However, one should not rule out the possibility that personal information could also be used for illegal financial operations.

I suppose that’s the main issue with this data leak - you don’t know whether you can trust your financial institution any longer if it cannot ensure that the personal information you entrust them with is kept safe.

[FAN ACCOUNT] 2013-06-21/22 What Time Is It Tour SEOUL CONCERT

It’s been almost three weeks now and all the memories must have subsided into the deepest corners of my subconscious, but I suppose the general impressions remain and I guess I can share them. This post would probably be perfect with photos and fancams to illustrate it, but I’m too lazy to upload everything, and you’ve seen all the stuff already anyways. Also, do not expect an exact order of the song list from me, because I am mixing Friday/Saturday events already, so I definitely can’t remember all the songs.

image

I had seating tickets for both days (section 13 for day 1 and section 14 for day 2). Although most of my Korean friends were kind of disappointed that I didn’t go for the standing, a) it was virtually impossible to get standing tickets on my own; and b) standing section is a hell through which I don’t want to go lol. After all, I considered myself lucky for having been able to pre-order the tickets on my own, despite the fact that a great number of tickets were snatched by Korean proxy agencies, and even quite a few of Korean fans were left without the tickets.

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In korea, there's this belief or i dunno what to call pattern maybe for people to behave accordingly to their blood type. And I noticed usually 'what is your blood type?' is frequently asked. Is it that important in korea? so they judge people by their bloodtype & personality translate frm the bloodtype is it? If that so, wooyoung's blood type is B, what kind/type of personality he got then? I find it interesting. Thank u :)

Anonymous

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_types_in_Japanese_culture

Type B

Best traits: Wild, active, doer, creative, passionate, strong

Worst traits: Selfish, irresponsible, unforgiving, erratic

(Applies to Korea as well)

Sorry for not answering properly but seriously. This is Google-able material. It’s somewhat similar to the Western astrological sign beliefs, although I think that blood-type personality is full of bull. It’s as reliable as the horoscopes in your morning paper.

The most ridiculous thing is that it really is important in Korea. A few weeks ago, a Korean asked me for my blood type and she was like: I KNEW IT, you are SO IT! It’s exactly the thing a Westerner would say if I were to say him/her my star sign… *shrug* Actually, Koreans get shocked if you don’t know your own blood type. I have a friend who doesn’t and she’s been to Korean a few times and each time, she confused the Koreans who asked by saying that she has no idea what her blood type is xD

However, Blood Type personalities ARE NOT RELIABLE. It’s just like saying Cancerians are really sensitive and cry often. Well, I’m a Cancerian, but I cry like once a year and only when I’m mad lol. The problem though, is that Koreans are really superstitious ㅡㅡ;;

Is the meaning of the word 'Idol' in korean different from english?why it seems that 'idol' is apretty negative word?and 2pm doesnt want to be an idol anymore?so how to define'idol'? R SJ TVXQ etc still considered as idols?

Anonymous

Hmm… I don’t think that the general meaning of “idol” in Korea is any different from English. After all, it IS an English word, and it came from the teen idols worshipped by teens in the Western world. So, you can basically put a lot of artists under the same “idol” umbrella - ranging from Justin Bieber and One Direction, to Shinhwa and B.A.P.

Idol is not a negative word per se in Korea. It’s just that the word “idol” refers to singers who mainly target teenage audience. They sort of work as role models for the teens, and rather than singing, they focus on their image, looks and so on. Therefore, there is a conception among general public that idols cannot sing well, and they are nothing but pretty looks.

2PM, as one of the first 3rd generation idol band actually, deviated from this definition from the very beginning, because for one, none of the members was under-aged when they made their début. Also, their target audience includes not only teens, but also women in their 20’s, 30’s, 40’s and above.

So the problem is that “idols” in Korea are generally defined as factory-like artists, that do not have a great input on their music. If you began as an idol, you will be an idol for the rest of your life. However, you can transcend that title with your work. For example, Rain began as an idol, but he’s definitely a lot more right now. The same goes for Lee Hyori and Shinhwa. They are icons recognized across the nation.

As for TVXQ and Super Junior, yes, they are still considered idols. I don’t see why they shouldn’t be. Being an idol is not a bad thing, as long as you prove you’re a lot more than just a pretty face.

Have you been to Busan? Doesn't know much about the place besides it having a nice sea, seagulls, and oh, wooyoung's hometown. Do you have any Busan friends? Is the 'dialect' used differed much from those spoken by Seoul residents (Remembered the time when woo said it is difficult to switch from Seoul to Busan while speaking with his friend on phone).

Anonymous

Unfortunately, I haven’t been to Busan. I know it sounds blasphemous, but I was really busy when I lived in Korea, and I only managed to go to Daegu twice. I wasn’t the student who parties all the time. I actually had to study two shifts and work full time ;~;

I have friends from Busan though, most of them are Wooyoung fans lol.

The Busan dialect is really different from the Seoul dialect. It differs in pronunciation, intonation, even grammar and vocabulary. If you learn Seoul dialect (which is considered to be standard), chances are you will have trouble understanding people not only in Busan, but in all Gyeongsang Province. A good example of Busan dialect is in drama Answer Me 1997 (Reply 1997). It’s almost entirely in Busan dialect, and I had to watch like three or four episodes until I got used to it. I mean, when you get the hang of it, it’s not too hard, it’s pretty easy to catch what people are talking about, but if they go deeper into unfamiliar vocabulary, it’s hard even for Koreans from other provinces to understand.

It’s like you’re learning British English RP (received pronunciation) only, and then you go to try it out in Glasgow pub or something. 

I am older than 2PM boys and calling them "oppa" would be rather incongruous. Also calling them just by their names would be not polite. How should I address them properly?

Anonymous

If you don’t speak Korean it’s perpectly fine to call them by their names. Also even if you are older than them, it’s okay to call them “oppa”, because you’re a fan. In Korean you can just use 씨 at the end of their names, which is a polite particle.
I think I covered this topic before here:

http://egle0702.tumblr.com/post/47556156810/hi-how-does-the-whole-call-an-older-guy-oppa-thing

What is it with idols and aegyo? Sometimes I felt like wanting to punch someone after watching the made-up "cuteness".(gwiyomi etc +.+'). Do Koreans really like aegyo?Is it some sort of their culture?

Anonymous

It’s not so much of idols and aegyo. It’s Koreans and aegyo. If a grown-up woman is called “cute” it’s actually a compliment. I don’t know where it comes from, and yes, it makes me want to punch those cutesy faces too, but I guess it’s sort of a Far East thing? There’s the “kawaii” culture in Japan, and Koreans have their “aegyo” and “kwiyeobda”. 

Personally, I’m okay with aegyo as long as it’s natural, but I can’t stand the fake aegyo that is forced. Unfortunately, most of it is like that.

And I’m not sure whether Koreans like aegyo. It more like feels that they’re just used to it, it’s the way “we do things”, so it’s gotta stay this way, you know? There are some things that Koreans just do, without questioning it, and I think aegyo is one of these things.

I mean, one of the first questions when I used to meet new people during get-together’s in Korea would be: where are you from, how old are you, are you good at aegyo.

Also, that’s one of the main mistakes that Koreans make abroad. I know a European woman who actually got insulted real bad when a Korean businessman called her “cute” meaning nothing but good lol.

(I guess for more info on aegyo itself you should use Google, because I never really researched deep into it)

It always curious me - how it is with army in general? I know that there is age limit, when you have to serve in military. But is it the age till when man must start his service or he must end his training? Maybe you know

Anonymous

As all (healthy) South Korean men need to enlist into army, they have to do it sooner or later. Voluntary enlistment starts at the age of 18. That is, you can enlist as soon as you become of age. Compulsory enlistment takes place at the age of 20. That is why a lot of Korean boys take academic leave after their 1st or 2nd year to enlist in the army. Actor Yoo Seung Ho turns 20 this year, so he enlisted in the army, although a lot of celebrities usually postpone enlistment because of their career. Some people think that he enlisted really soon, but he actually did it at the same age as the majority of Korean men do.

Until 2011 military recruitment was limited to those until 31 years of age, however, after a few reforms the age limit was extended until 36 years of age. So, if for some reason, you can’t enlist when you’re 20, you can do it until you’re 35 or so.

Thus, the age limit for Korean army recruitment is 18-35 years.

May 5

I assume that mentioning on twitter/youtube/facebook counts only after official release?

Anonymous

That depends on each TV stations’ rules, which I am not aware of. I recommend asking at wild2day forum or tumblr about it, because lately SNS and other support rules are so complicated, that even K-fans go @.@ at them.